Camera instant prints turn photos into sketches

Camera instant prints turn photos into sketchesDan Macnish / danmacnish.com

Australian engineer Dan McNish (Dan Macnish) have created a camera that turns filmed scenes at a sketch and immediately prints it out on paper. Algorithm the camera recognizes objects in the frame, and then searches the objects found in dataset Google Quick, Draw!, consisting of tens of millions of sketches, created by volunteers, says the developer on its website.

In 2016, the company Google launched an experimental service Quick, Draw!, where users are asked to make a simple drawing of an object, for example, draw a cat, and a machine learning algorithm is trying to identify what drew people. With the help of this service, the company has accumulated a huge data set makes it possible to train algorithms to match drawings of people with real-world objects. Google not only began to use this data in their services, for example, AutoDraw, able to turn sketches in a neatly painted objects, but also opened the data to other experts in the field of machine learning by publishing them on GitHub. Dataset consists of 50 million pictures, classified in 345 categories.

Engineer from Melbourne Dan McNish (Dan Macnish) used this dataset in your project in reverse — he taught the algorithm to recognize objects of the real world in outline, and Vice versa — to turn the real world into the drawings. The basis of the created system is based on trained neural network model based on the framework TensorFlow and published by Google in 2017. They recognize objects in the scene and refer them to the appropriate category. After this, the algorithm associates these objects with the categories of dataset Quick Draw! is the image consisting of the outline of the relevant items placed similar to how objects are located on the original frame from the camera.

Camera instant prints turn photos into sketches

“Snapshots” from the camera

Camera instant prints turn photos into sketchesDan Macnish / danmacnish.com

Australian engineer Dan McNish (Dan Macnish) have created a camera that turns filmed scenes at a sketch and immediately prints it out on paper. Algorithm the camera recognizes objects in the frame, and then searches the objects found in dataset Google Quick, Draw!, consisting of tens of millions of sketches, created by volunteers, says the developer on its website.

In 2016, the company Google launched an experimental service Quick, Draw!, where users are asked to make a simple drawing of an object, for example, draw a cat, and a machine learning algorithm is trying to identify what drew people. With the help of this service, the company has accumulated a huge data set makes it possible to train algorithms to match drawings of people with real-world objects. Google not only began to use this data in their services, for example, AutoDraw, able to turn sketches in a neatly painted objects, but also opened the data to other experts in the field of machine learning by publishing them on GitHub. Dataset consists of 50 million pictures, classified in 345 categories.

Engineer from Melbourne Dan McNish (Dan Macnish) used this dataset in your project in reverse — he taught the algorithm to recognize objects of the real world in outline, and Vice versa — to turn the real world into the drawings. The basis of the created system is based on trained neural network model based on the framework TensorFlow and published by Google in 2017. They recognize objects in the scene and refer them to the appropriate category. After this, the algorithm associates these objects with the categories of dataset Quick Draw! is the image consisting of the outline of the relevant items placed similar to how objects are located on the original frame from the camera.

Camera instant prints turn photos into sketches

“Snapshots” from the camera

To create camera the developer used a single-Board computer Raspberry Pi 3, Raspberry Pi Camera module V2 Module, the thermal printer, the shutter button and the led placed in the cardboard case. After pressing the button the led lights up for 2-3 seconds, required to process image, then the printer prints black and white hand-drawn interpretation of what the algorithm has seen in the frame.

At the end of 2017 Google summed up the interim results of the project Quick, Draw!, and talked about how to draw the same objects that people from different parts of the world. For example, the Italians paint on an ice-cream cone more balls than the Australians, and inhabitants of Russia often draw houses without doors. In addition, for the year of service users drew nearly a billion stars and 2.9 million cats.

Author: Main editor

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